04/18/2018

Magnums, are they better for my Cellar?

Bigger is better.

A magnum protects your wine from dangers – light, heat, temperature variance or vibrations. A thicker bigger bottle has thicker glass than regular bottles.

“The real beauty of these abnormal bottles, are their ability to allow wine to age slowly and gracefully”.

The corks are generally better and porous, so they let oxygen in, albeit very slowly. Oxygen modifies the wine over time and this results in a better maturation, based on the smaller surface area in the bottle.

Wines are usually made in Magnum 1500mls or (half magnum/ Standard size) 750mls 5 glasses to a bottle – after that the Biblical guys come in…

3.0 litres | Double Magnum

Two Magnums or four standard 750 ml bottles, equating to approximately 20 glasses of wine.

4.5 litres | Jeroboam

AKA the King of Kings – six standard 750 ml bottles.

6.0 litres | Imperial

This bottle yields eight standard 750 ml bottles – you’re looking at about 40 glasses of wine; that’s no less than a lot of wine to get through. Solution? Have 10 people for dinner – problem solved.

9.0 litres | Salmanazar

Named after an Assyrian King, this is 12 standard 750 ml bottles. That’s a full case of wine in one big ol’ bottle.

12.0 L |Balthazar

Named after one of the three kings who first met Jesus, there are 16 standard 750 ml bottles in this baby.

15.0 L Nebuchadnezzar

Also known as the King of Babylon, this is the equivalent of 20 standard 750 ml bottles. If you’re a little slow on the maths, that’s 100 glasses – nothing short of A – lot!